Posts Tagged inhaler

Asthma Inhaler Costs — ripoff alert

ripoffAsthmatic abuse:  (definition)  The systematic and intentional market manipulation of asthma medication prices resulting in large corporate profits and financial ruin for people with asthma (see also: racketeering, theft, extortion, corruption, complicity and congress).

Price gouging of people with asthma by U.S. pharmaceutical companies is legendary (New York Times).   Now some of those same companies want to move their corporate offices to other countries to avoid U.S. taxes.  RIPOFF is the technical term.

mdisprayAn inhaler is a pressurized gadget to make a mist of a medication so a person can inhale the mist  (see the picture at the right).   It should have never been patented:  it is useful, but it is trivial and certainly not novel.   Now, through patent manipulations and suits there are NO GENERIC INHALERS FOR ASTHMATICS; there are only high priced brand name products — despite the fact this type of sprayer and medication has been available for 40 years.

Albuterol is the most common anti-asthma inhaler.  The drug is easy to manufacture (costs a few cents) and the inhaler is trivial (costs less than a dollar).  The US price listed below is from  Costco (considered the lowest price source in the US).  The Indian price quoted below is from allmedsdeal.com (this is not an endorsement,  just an example).

  • The US price:  PROAIR HFA 90 MCG INHALER (TEV)       $55.46
  • The Indian price:  Ventorlin CFC Free Inhaler / Salbutamol 100mcg  (GSK)    $4.40

These are the same drugs:   US price $55, Indian price $4.   GSK is a reputable UK company that  manufactures albuterol, sells it worldwide, but not in the US.  Without the unreasonable market restrictions and nearly insane FDA rules asthmatics would be able to purchase albuterol for about $4 per inhaler.

THE SOLUTION:

Patents should be allowed to exist, but consumer prices  must be limited.  Countries other than the US exercise this control.   Citizens fight price-gouging companies — why not fight price-gouging drug companies?  Medicare insists doctors accept payment at the lowest rate offered, so why should Medicare  fail to insist on the lowest price drug companies offer elsewhere in the world?

The current laws for pharmaceuticals are so complicated it defies understanding.  If you like complexity, like laws and like legal suits then continue the current system.  Instead, consider the following:

What part of this simple rule would be difficult to understand:

 THE RETAIL PRICE OF ALBUTEROL INHALER SHALL BE $4.

That’s the kind of pharmaceutical control the US needs.

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Prescription Medications — sky high price

pillsnbills

Elisabeth Rosenthal wrote the lead story for The New York Times today (10/13/13) “The Soaring Cost of a Simple Breath“.  This is another blockbuster exposé of drug costs that are crippling US health care.  Sadly, not a story about what is being done to correct the problem.

Here are some of her key points:

  • The average brand name prescription has risen from 1995 at $40 to 2013 at $170
  • The average generic prescription has risen from 1995 at $20 to 2013 at $45.
  • A common asthma medication Pulmicort costs $175 in the US but only $20 in the UK and $25 in France.
  • Drugs account for 10% of the $2.7 trillion annual health bill.
  • Americans take more generic medications than people in other countries (they just can’t afford branded or new medications)
  • Other countries set the wholesale price of drugs to make drugs affordable.
  • US pharmaceutical companies have used the FDA to restrict manufacturing rules to favor large companies and have used the judicial system to bankrupt competitors.
  • US pharmaceutical companies have paid generic companies not to sell their products in the US.
  • Medicaid, paid for by taxes, pays millions of dollars to drug companies for high priced medications.
  • Asthma medications have been the target of profiteering drug companies.  Not a single inhaler is available as a generic.  Despite the fact that inhaled medications have been available for over 30 years.  The effect on people with this condition is a tremendous burden.
  • Drug companies spend about 50% of funds on marketing and only about 20% on drug research.  Other advanced countries prohibit marketing prescription medications directly  to consumers.
  • Medicare is prohibited from negotiating prices.
  • Drug prescribing guidelines published by the government are prohibited from considering cost.

Rather than just be angry about the sorry state of drug costs, what can be done?  Just take a lesson from other countries, this is not rocket science:

  • The US government should set the prices for all drugs
  • The FDA needs to loosen the rules for generic manufacturing — for goodness sake, an inhaler is an inhaler, not the space shuttle.
  • Comparative effectiveness research should be required, and the results published for doctors as in the UK.  Drug cost is important to all US citizens, so restricting the government from considering cost  borders on insanity (perhaps giving psychiatric medications to Congress is currently too expensive).
  • Finally, there is no excuse for the current drug cost problem — other countries have solved the problem, the US needs to do the same.

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