Archive for category Rating Health Care Providers

Medicare Penalizes Hospitals — safety problems

MC Hospital Penalties

Hospitals in the lowest quartile of safety scores from Oct 1, 2014 to Nov 30, 2015 were recently penalized 1% of Medicare billings as detailed on the Medicare.gov web site.  The above graphic highlights the results in terms of the number of hospitals penalized per million medicare enrollees in each state.  Red indicates the most hospitals penalized and green indicates the least with the lighter shades in between.

New York had many hospitals penalized but Alaska only had a few.   However, Alaska does not look very good considering they don’t have very many Medicare enrolees (or other people for that matter).  So a patient’s chance of experiencing safety problems is higher in Alaska.  This reflects poorly on the State-wide hospital quality programs and the importance hospitals in that state place on quality.   If you live in a state with poor performing hospitals then be especially careful to pick hospitals with the best scores.  KHN.org  lists the poor performing hospitals.

The four Medicare safety measures were somewhat limited and heavily focused on surgery:

  1. The AHRQ Patient Safety Indicator (PSI 90 Composite)
  2. Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI)
  3. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI)
  4. Surgical Site Infection (SSI) – colon and hysterectomy

What should be done?

  1. Patients should avoid hospitals with lower scores
  2. Poor performing hospitals should make better use of state quality resources.  Spend more money on boosting quality than on remodeling or building new facilities.
  3. High performing hospitals should redouble safety efforts.  Improved performance by competitors could push complacent hospitals toward lower ratings.
  4. Hospitals should not just focus efforts on the few areas that are rated — overall safe care and quality care are the goals.  The basis for financial penalties could, and very likely will, change.

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Rate Your Health Care Provider

The following rating system is intended for adult primary care office visits, but could also apply to some specialty visits.  There are no extra points for famous doctors, university clinics or the only provider in town.  Add up the points to see how your provider’s office is doing.

Performance Points
When I call the office, who answers?
 A real person 2
 A computer answering system that connects to a real person 1
I know the office will provide appointments:
New patient appointments within 3 weeks or
Follow-up appointment for new problem in 3 days
2
Urgent problem (during office hours) on same day 3
 The office designates time for walk-in visits  2
 The office has some evening and weekend hours  2
Moving through the office (assuming you were on time)
 Checked-in within 5 minutes 2
 Checked-in within 5 to 10 minutes 1
 Face to face with the provider
within 5 minutes of appointment time or
within 30 minutes for a walk-in visit
3
 Face to face with the provider
within 10 minutes of appointment time or
within 45 minutes for a walk-in visit
2
Checked-out within 5 minutes of leaving provider 2
Checked-out within 5 to 10 minutes of leaving provider 1
 Provider visit
 I do not have to take off clothes before seeing provider 2
 I can sit in a chair at eye level with the provider 2
 Provider seems to care about me 5
 I am not interrupted while I say the reasons for the visit 4
 The part of my body with problems is examined 3
 The paper chart or the computer is just used
by the provider to find information to help me
2
 The diagnosis of my problem is made clear 4
 I am directed to handouts or Internet sites about my problems 1
 Before I leave, the provider asks if I have any other questions 3
 It is clear when I need to return for recheck 3
 Medication Management:
 The reasons I need to take all medications are explained 3
 My provider sends prescriptions by computer 2
 Possible side effects of medications are discussed 1
 At each visit I receive a list of my active medications 3
 Tests (x-rays, blood tests, EKG, biopsies etc.)
If I need tests I am told why 2
 The office always lets me know test results within a week 2
 I always get copies of test results 2
 Practice environment
 My provider has associates who substitute when needed 2
 Hospital care is done by hospitalists 2
 My provider is part of a system including specialists 2
 Physician assistants or nurse practitioners work at the office 2

 TOTAL POINTS  =  

Score Rating
 60 and over  5 star
 50 to 59  4 star
 40 to 49  3 star
 30 to 39  2 star
 below 30  1 star

Hotels have struggled to get the coveted 5 star rating for decades.  It is not just whether the hotel chef can make a souffle but whether the whole experience of staying in the hotel is superior.   The items in the above score are considered elements of quality for health care delivery.  It’s not easy to get 5 stars.

Medical and surgical care has focused on diagnosis and treatment for hundreds of years.  To that end individual providers spend years, if not decades, honing diagnosis and treatment (some say, to a fault).   The vast majority of problems in primary care are fairly easy to diagnose (like diaper rash, acne and diabetes).  Treatment is harder because it spans time, is a process and requires patient engagement.  So, as it turns out, the wrapper may be as important as the package.  Providers are well trained and licensed but the wrapper of delivering care is where quality, safety, cost-effectiveness and satisfaction reside.

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