Archive for category drug costs

Deprescribe — too many medications

bottle_of_medsMany patients take too many medications which leads to unnecessary side effects, drug interactions and high cost.  Yet physicians sometimes fight just to get patients to take necessary medications.  Two examples:

  1. Provider:  How many medications are you taking?
    Patient:  Including vitamins I think fifteen.
    Provider:  What? I only have two medications on my list.
    Patient:  I restarted all the medications I was taking before you hospitalized me plus all the new prescriptions from when I left the hospital and I added some vitamins.
  2. Patient:  I stopped that medication because I thought it was causing my hair to fall out.
    Provider:  Your heart medication does not cause hair to fall out.  And, even if it did you could die without it.

The medications you take should be reviewed at each visit so you and the provider consider which are truly needed and why.  The provider who gives the patient a prescription is responsible to make sure there is no interaction or duplication with ongoing treatment.  Yes, that means cardiologists and dentists also.  A proactive patient should simply ask, “Is that new medication compatible with all of my existing medications and does it replace one of the existing medications?

The highest risk situation for evaluation of medications happens when alternate providers become involved.  Like a hospital doctor, an ER doctor or a specialist.  They tend to add medications without fully considering the existing medications, often thinking the primary provider will resolve any drug issues — too bad when a fill-in primary provider steps into the mix.

An article in the Washington Post January 28, 2017 by Dr. Ranit Mishori advises the following questions for providers and patients to consider together about medications:

● What is this medication, and why am I taking it?
● Are there non-pharmacologic options to treat this condition?
● How long do I need to be on it?
● What are the benefits of continuing to take it?
● What are the possible harms of using that medication?
● Do any of my medications interact with any another?
● Can I lower the doses of any of these medications?
● Which of my medications are more likely to be nonbeneficial considering my age, my other medical conditions and my life expectancy?
● Are there any medications I can get off completely?

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A Design For American Health Care

ahc_logo2What an opportunity!  A design for American Health Care that is badly needed, a blank slate, an open door, a blank check.  So what blogger could resist the obvious invitation.  First is the logo — I hope you like it.  No more Medicare, Medicaid, Indian Health Service, Veterans Administration, Blue Cross or United Health.

Who gets AHC?  Well, every US citizen.

How much does it cost?   The annual out of pocket cost is limited to just $1000.

Is there any paper work?  NO.  No paperwork, no bills, no EOB, and no insurance claims.

What do you need for healthcare?  Just your AHC card.

What is the price list?

  • Office visits:  $25
  • ER visits $50
  • Thirty day prescription $10
  • Surgery  $100
  • Hospitalization $200
  • Medical equipment $75
  • Medical devices $75
  • Ambulance $100

What is the national healthcare budget?  It’s set by congress.  Initially budget neutral at three trillion dollars (or whatever budget neutral at this time).

Where does the money come from?  Taxes.  Instead of insurance premiums it’s included in your taxes.

Do insurance companies go out of business?  No.  They process claims from healthcare providers, pharmacies, hospitals etc.  The person getting healthcare does not need to be involved with all the paperwork.

What government agency runs the program?  Medicare, under the AHC name.  Providers bill the claims processor and AHC pays the processor.

Is great American health research affected?  No.  This is a health care system.  Research is not health care and is outside the system.

Can people obtain health services, like for cosmetic surgery?  Sure.  Any services you want to purchase yourself outside AHC is fine.  But, you still pay the same taxes.  AHC does not pay for private care.

Are the States excluded?  No.  The States are responsible for managing AHC in their States.  The Federal Government sets the standards for the country.  The States make it happen.

Why would national costs be lower?  Because America as a country negotiates prices and because cost would be capped by the congressional budget for care.  The cost would be the same the first year.  Waste is a major problem — with better management of a system waste can be addressed.  Since about one half of US healthcare cost is consumed by waste there is lots of room for improvement.

What about poor people?  The deductible would be lower than $1000 — but because the deductible is low to begin with not many would need this help.

Now would be a good time for the applause.  Your humble blogger thanks you.

 

 

 

 

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Drug Research Needs The Placebo — that’s science

placebo_pillNew drugs need to be compared to something.  And, at a very minimum that something is the placebo, a sugar pill.  When you see an advertisement claiming some product is 80% better, a reasonable person would ask, “better than what?”

A comparison group is hugely important in all of science.  One of the biggest flaws in all research is not picking an appropriate control or comparison which makes the research worthless.

Erik Vance of the Washington Post reported on 12/2/16: “People susceptible to the placebo effect may be keeping us from getting new drugs.”  The idea is many drugs can’t be proven to be better than a placebo.  The FDA prevents those poor drug companies from marketing those drugs and making tons of money.

So here is the anti-scientific conclusion Mr. Vance reported: only use people that are unaffected by placebos in the control group.  Sadly, that would exclude most conscious human beings.  The control group would be strange people that could feel the tiny effects of the drug and ignore any psychological impact of taking a pill.  And, voilà drug approved.  A drug that most people would find no better than eating a sugar cube could be marketed at $800 per pill.  And, advertisements could fool most practicing physicians into prescribing it.

This idea is totally nuts.  The FDA would be within its authority to only allow the drug to be prescribed to that small group of strange people, not the whole world.  Assuming the FDA was reasonably competent the idea and the huge profits should go down the drain.

Do you want to take a medicine that fails to work as well as a sugar pill?  Probably not.  Expect good science. Demand honest comparison with placebos.

 

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EpiPen (R) (ephinepherine) — price problems

epinephrine_sMylan is the company that makes EpiPen(R).  It was one of those “inversion” companies that started in the US but is incorporated in the Netherlands to avoid taxes.  Yet, the administrative offices are in Pennsylvanian in the US.  It sells EpiPen(R) all over the world.  In Australia a subsidiary called AlphaPharm sells the product.  It’s a handy plastic syringe device that allows a person with a severe allergic reaction to grab the device and give an injection quickly.

It’s so handy that the company can sell the $1 device containing 3 cents of epinephrine for $697.  That’s the price quoted by Costco.  The same drug can be purchased online through Canadadrugs.com for $112.71 and through Kiwidrug.com for $122.51.  

It’s not clear why other companies that package injectable drugs don’t supply prefilled syringes for this purpose — probably a very aggressive legal department or the acquisition of competing suppliers.  The device is not something novel — it’s just a syringe — so it should never have received a patent.

Emergency Rooms and doctor’s offices don’t fool around with the EpiPen(R).  They just purchase cheap vials of epinephrine and cheap syringes to give the dose for a few dollars.  A patient could do this with a little training — it would save a lot of money.  The cost of an EpiPen(R) so high the people who need the medication don’t buy it — so the few seconds a patient might take to draw up the medication in a syringe is better than no medication at all.

The Mylan company is a good example of why drug companies should be more regulated and have profits limited.


Addendum 7-16-2016

Mylan purchased the decades old EpiPen(R) rights from Merck in 2007.  The consumer price in 2007 was about $60.  With a major marketing effort (basically convincing patients, schools and healthcare facilities to always have the product available) the price is now about $700 accounting for about 50% of company profits.  Teva Pharmaceuticals is working on a generic epinephrine injector but it probably will not be available until 2018.  A startup company Windgap Medical has invented a device using powdered epinephrine but it may be many years, if ever, before the device arrives on the market — but, the device promises to extend the shelf life from 18 months (for the EpiPen) to several years.

Here are some good references about EpiPen(R) and Mylan


Addendum 8/27/16

There is a perfectly acceptable (FDA approved) alternative to EpiPen in the form a competing product called Adrenaclick which costs only about $140 (according to GoodRx) for a two pack. This product does little advertising — certainly not as much as EpiPen. But, advertising does not equate to product superiority.  To get the less expensive product:

  1. If the prescriber wrote a prescription in a generic format (Epinephrine auto-injector 0.3 mg (or 0.15 mg) for injection in case of allergic emergency) then a patient should simply call the pharmacy to obtain the lower cost alternative.
  2. If the prescriber wrote the prescription for the easy-to-remember brand name a patient should simply call the prescriber’s office and ask that a replacement prescription be sent to the pharmacy for the Adrenoclick in the same dose as for the EpiPen.
  3. The two devices are not exactly the same but the technique is very similar. The patient should read the directions very carefully to understand the small differences — read this when the medication arrives, not when an emergency is present. The pharmacist is required to provide personal instructions and answer questions about products they sell.

Although the Adrenoclick is less expensive it is still much too expensive. The manufacturing price is probably less than $10 each.  Also, keep in mind the shelf life — liquid epinephrine only has a shelf life of 18 months — so even if the medication is not used there is a recurring cost for replacement.

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US Healthcare Expenditures — what’s going on?

graphdata

Profits for insurance companies and drug companies are skyrocketing.  Data from CMS (2013 and 2014) are tabulated below.   The big finding is the cost of healthcare is going up much faster than inflation.  And, the lack of regulation is allowing insurance companies and drug companies to gouge consumers in the US.

Between 2013 and 2014 prescription drugs increased by 9.8% and net insurance cost (i.e. profit) increased by 12.1%.  If life expectancy was going up at the same rate it would be a good deal — but, that’s not happening.

Despite the complexity there are rather simple solutions.

  1. Limit insurance company profits (these are not healthcare providers — these are paper shufflers!).
  2. Inform prescribers which drugs are cost effective.  That means expanding FDA oversight or starting a new agency less influenced by industry lobbying.
  3. Limit drug company profits to 7% like most other developed countries.

The table below lists the expenditures for various categories of health care.  The figures are in millions of dollars.  The total expenditures for US healthcare in 2014 were over 3 trillion dollars.

us health care expenditures sorted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spreadsheet: US Healthcare Costs 2014

US expenditures 2014

 

 

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Oncology Drugs — shortcuts and high cost

ShortcutSome shortcuts just don’t work out.  The US oncology drug industry has found ways to reduce the time from drug discovery to market by taking shortcuts called “surrogate endpoints”.

The two most important questions cancer patients have when thinking about cancer drugs are 1) how much life do I gain? (survival) and 2) will I feel OK while I survive? (quality of life).  The problem for drug makers is it is expensive and time consuming to answer those questions (to use endpoints of survival and quality of life).

Drug surrogates are measurements that show some effect of a cancer drug but are not absolutely related to those 2 primary questions.  An example of a surrogate endpoint is “event-free survival”.  This is a measure of time, like the time from when chemotherapy is given before something bad happens.  Clearly important, but not the same as survival or quality of life.

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has a list of surrogate endpoints it will accept in order to approve cancer drugs.  Drug companies have progressively moved research to those surrogate endpoints.  The graph below is based on the data of Martel.Cancer Treatment Endpoints

Many times this shortcut is helpful for patients but it is always helpful for drug makers.  It has decreased the costs associated with marketing a drug.  But, the cost of drugs has gone up at a faster rate than the prolongation of life the drugs impart.  And, that survival may not be a benefit in quality of life.  Now, virtually all new anticancer drugs exceed the $50,000 per quality life year many social researchers say is the amount our economy can afford.  It means insurance can’t include those drugs otherwise premiums would be so high the average citizen could not afford the insurance.  Here is a very disturbing graph from an article by Howard.chemo costs and life year

The vertical axis is that cost being paid for one year of life provided by a cancer drug.  The horizontal axis is the year in which that drug was approved.  Meaning it’s not a very good deal — the cost of one year of life gained by chemotherapy is rising and you likely can’t afford such drugs.  The economics are really depressing and the situation is absolutely not sustainable.  Rather than hoping a treatment will be invented we will be hoping the cost of that treatment is within reach.

There are signs the cancer drugs are overpriced, inflated by speculation and simple price gouging.  To the extent such unethical practices exist they need to be rooted out and stopped.  Given the past history of big pharma there is likely a lot that needs to be fixed.

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Why the US Pays More for Drugs

MoneyThe people in the United States pay more for drugs than any other country.  And, they pay more to universities to do drug research than other countries.  In a nutshell, it is due to a lack of regulation in the U.S.

Two very insightful articles appeared in the past week addressing the inequity of global drug prices — The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

Drug companies constantly complain regulations are hurting profits.  Now it appears without enough regulation drug companies are hurting sick patients.  As big pharma points out, it’s all legal.  Basically, big pharma points a finger at the US Congress for not imposing restrictions common in the rest of the world.  Sounds like a circular argument!

Between the two articles linked above and this author’s experience here are the reasons:

  1. Abuse of patent laws
  2. Driving small drug  companies and generic companies out of business with frivolous but highly expensive suits.
  3. Release of a similar drug before a patent expires and manipulating doctors and patients to change to the new drug suggesting the similar drug is “MUCH” better (evergreening).
  4. Paying new drug makers to delay marketing their competitive drug (pay-to-delay).  While at the same time asking for a fast track through the FDA approval process.
  5. Claiming a new drug is novel when by any reasonable standard it is not (asthma inhalers are a good example).
  6. Coupling devices to drugs to double the difficulty for competition (like insulin pumps).
  7. Failing to pay their fair share of basic drug research, funded by the US government instead.
  8. Happily doing “inversion” deals to move headquarters to other countries to evade US taxes — into the very countries that strongly regulate drug company profits.
  9. Voluntarily limiting profits in many countries due to the threat of regulation, but failing to offer the same deal to the US.
  10. Lobbying successfully to prevent Medicare (a larger health program than the NHS in the UK) from negotiating prices as the UK has done for many years.
  11. Blackmailing patients to pay for old drugs at exorbitant prices because generic companies are afraid to compete (pricing because-they-can, oral beclomethasone is one example).
  12. Preventing drugs from other countries to be sold across borders because of unfounded safety concerns (crocodile tears).
  13. Actively avoiding drug comparison research — forcing others to do that type of research after the drug is already marketed.
  14. Doing cancer drug research with endpoints (such as tumor size) rather than life expectancy.  85% of cancer drugs now have no connection to the most basic expectation of patients, to live longer.
  15. The WSJ review of 40 drugs administered in physicians offices:  39 cost less in the UK, 37 cost less in Norway and 28 cost less in Ontario Canada.  The price gouging in the US certainly suggests racketeering.
  16. Drug company profits are 17% in the US and 7% elsewhere.
  17.  Actively avoid cost-effectiveness research — prescribers don’t know whether a new drug is better or worse than old drugs except by what is told to them by marketing.  (Unlike the UK drug system which is strongly linked to cost-effectiveness)
  18. Drug companies hide special deals with large customers so other customers have no idea of the low end of the price spectrum.  The companies are so large that a lone US State can not leverage deals needed to lower prices like countries can.

Perhaps I have missed some other corrupt practice or unethical behavior, there are just so many.  This mess needs to be cleaned up!  At very least the US Congress needs to institute controls similar to other countries.  Feel free to send this blog to your congressional representative — with a copy of your drug bills!

 

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