Control Drug Costs — help from the ACA

costThe Affordable Care Act (ACA) does have some teeth to reduce drug prices.  The ACA formed a 15 member group intended to restrain the growth in cost of Medicare without reducing benefits.  The Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) has powers to improve efficiency and prevent Medicare from being victimized by business interests.

Mergers of large pharmaceutical companies have created near monopolies for setting prices — the new specialty drugs are a case in point.  Also, by repeatedly suing smaller companies and generic manufacturers the competition is under siege if not defeated.   The huge rise in drug prices have become a national disaster because individuals and Medicare just can’t afford the price gouging.

The IPAB has some power to help the problem — hopefully they will act to implement reference pricing of new drugs.  It forces drugs with a similar effect to charge the same amount — old drugs and new.  So if a new wonderful drug “Neximabob” is no better for arthritis than ibuprofen then the prices must be the same.

The Federal Drug Administration can not require drug-comparison research.  This has been a wonderful marketing loophole for big pharma.  It’s time consuming to do comparison research.  By the time “Neximabob” is found to be a sham, billions of prescriptions have been filled,billions of dollars have been paid and Medicare has lost billions.  But, you will be happy to know, the FDA says “Neximabob” is safe and effective.

The IBAP can act on expert opinion rather than wait for full comparison research.  One option for drug companies is to do the comparison research (which they fight) or do more lobbying (more that the hundreds of millions they already spend).

Guess where the money for drug lobbying comes from?  the very tax payers and Medicare recipients who pay for the medications in the first place — it’s just not fair.  Next time you hear the IBAP is so so bad you will know who is speaking — it’s not consumers!


Note:   According to the Congressional Research Service the IBAP is not currently active because the rise in Medicare cost in 2015 is not enough to trigger actions by the committee.  There is some thought it may become active in 2017 unless repealed by Congress.

 

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