Specialty Drugs — at a price you can’t afford

specialtydrugcostBig Pharma blows the lid off the price for “specialty drugs”.  Those drugs now cost more than an average American’s income.  By 2020 the average specialty drug will cost $80,000 per year, just pray you don’t need two of them!

The data plotted above come from AARP.  The raw data is concerning and three questions beg to be answered:  WHY is this happening, IS THIS A PROBLEM and if it is a problem WHAT IS THE SOLUTION.

WHY?  — because big pharma wants to make a lot of money.  Somewhere, long ago and far away, some researcher wanted to help people with difficult medical problems.  But, that altruistic thought was crushed as the drug was marketed.

PROBLEM? — absolutely, the US healthcare system can not afford the drugs and neither can average individuals.   If a drug costs a trillion dollars it’s not a drug, it’s a joke.  So where is big pharma going wrong?  Here are some possible choices:

  • Too much is spent on research
  • Too much is spent on advertising
  • Too much profit is paid to shareholders

Where is US healthcare going wrong?

  • Too little regulation exists to require cost effectiveness research before marketing drugs
  • Too little drug price control is being exerted by the government.
  • Too little mirroring of price controls in other countries that shift profit taking to the US.

SOLUTIONS?  — if the trend is allowed to continue “Bronze” health insurance will not cover specialty drugs but “Platinum” insurance will.  Sadly, only the top 1% will be able to afford the “Platinum” plan.  The US will have more of a two tier healthcare system with a huge gap between the 99% and the 1%.

  • Impose cost controls on drugs — extremely high priced drugs should trigger rules to lower profits so such drugs will either cost less or not be produced.
  • Demand cost benefit analysis on all drugs before marketing — if the benefit is not worth the cost then don’t add them to the formulary for Medicare or Medicaid.
  • Wrap drug costs inside health plans.  That way other factors get consideration, like preventive care,  hip surgery, simple childhood vaccinations,  and pregnancy.  The big pharma bill should not be coming “off-the-top”.

 

 

 

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