Insurance CEO Paid $66,000,000 — for what?

hatinringThe author of this blog is willing to be the CEO of United Healthcare for a mere $60,000,000 / year.  That would save the insurance company 6 million dollars a year — a real bargain.   So why does United Healthcare need a new CEO?

The Wall Street Journal reported today that United Healthcare (the nations largest healthcare insurer) can’t seem to make enough money with clients who get insurance on the government exchanges.  They feel other insurance companies should have those pesky patients, who cost more for a couple of years, because they did not have insurance before.

United Healthcare (NYSE:UNH) has been having a lackluster financial situation for the past few months, like almost all other stocks — perhaps a little worse.  Reports show the health insurer will lower its earnings-per-share outlook to $6 per share, down from its earlier forecast of $6.25 to $6.35 per share.

Could it be that the 25 cent drop in earnings is due to business on the exchanges? — surely it’s not the fault of the CEO?   But, why take a chance, get a new CEO.  The company could get a new CEO for half the price and even might be able to snag someone with a PhD in economics to help figure out what to do.   Duh — lower the operating costs!

Presidential candidate, Dr. Ben Carson*, says insurance companies should be low-cost non-profit operations simply to process claims.  It makes a lot of sense.  Why is so much profit being extracted from the US healthcare system by insurance companies?  It does not need to be that way.  The companies keep about 20% to 25% of premiums for CEO salary, expenses and profits.  In France, insurance companies are limited to 6%.  Yes, it can be done.

 


 

* This is not a political endorsement, just an observation.

 

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