Switch to Generic Medications — no problem!

genericmedSwitching from a brand name medication to an available generic medication is safe, easy and will likely save you a lot of money.  Thanks to the work of the FDA, generic medications in the United States are quite safe.  Patients in the US take more generics than in other countries.

When a patient starts a new brand-name drug (e.g. Lipitor) there is a risk of a side effect or allergy to the active ingredient.   But, when a patient switches to a generic medication (e.g. atorvastatin) the patient already knows the active ingredient agrees with them so the chance of a reaction is as close to zero as medical science can make it.

Prescribers are well aware that some generic medications may come in different forms (tablets or capsules) and different strengths — this is not a problem, the prescription just has to be adjusted to match what the patient needs.  Most care providers are quite willing to make the change to help lower the cost of treatment — patients tend to take medications they can afford!

The Wall Street Journal had a story today based on the opinion of a “pharmacist-economist” who has been a lead author on only one paper in the past 20 years and who thinks tablets and capsules of the same medication are distinct entities (yes, but it makes no practical difference).  The WSJ is clearly interested how the switch to generics affects the economics for big pharma — it would not be good and the stocks could go down — such a disaster.  However, if you have stock in a brand-name company you could use your stock dividends to pay for the drug.

The new bio-similar drugs and even some old drugs (like warfarin) may have a slightly different effect that depends on some minor manufacturing quirk.  Prescribers are well aware of these peculiar drugs and can easily make adjustments and do tests as needed.  Fortunately, small manufacturing differences for the vast majority of drugs is a distinction without a difference for the patient.

This principle needs to be considered in everyday terms.  The table salt at restaurants may come from separate and  distinct sources — it really makes no difference to the customer — salt is salt!  Marketing departments want you the think a generic is like coal and a brand-name is like diamond — intellectual garbage.

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