Improve ACA — so says USA Today

peopletowerKelly Kennedy of USA Today published the story “Finding Consensus on How to Improve the ACA” 2/28/14.

Here is the list:

  1. Pay doctors more
  2. Let the government pay subsidies to families not covered by the employee’s health insurance.
  3. Get rid of fee-for-service payments
  4. Smooth the transition from Medicaid to subsidized health insurance
  5. Transparent pricing

There are obviously some problems with this “consensus”.  To begin with, who is part of the consensus?  And who benefits from the 5 suggestions?  On the face the ideas seem OK but where is overall cost reduction — the real crux of our health care problem?

So, to address each point:

  1. Pay doctors more — if the payment is not tied to reducing health care costs and increasing quality then it is money down the drain.
  2. Covering families — seems simple enough but why should business be exempt from doing what they have traditionally done?  Employer insurance needs to cover the whole family — that’s simple.
  3. Get rid of fee-for-service.  Yes that payment method  is a problem but there must be an incentive for health care providers to provide a high volume of work and an incentive to do quality work.  The simple solution is to pay a health care system (an accountable care organization) to provide care for a large group of people for a yearly fee.  The organization must meet quality and budget constraints as opposed to our current “the sky is the limit” fee model.
  4. Smooth the the transition away from Medicaid.  At this point Medicaid is less expensive than standard indemnity plans — why think about a change?  If the person enters the workforce the employer just pays the cost — simple.  Changing providers is not easy but if quality is uniformly better there would not be such concern.
  5. Transparent pricing.  This is presented to suggest people could decide on what tests and treatments to buy if only they knew the prices — patients have never had the knowledge to make that decision and never will.  The transparency of pricing should be the price for ALL the healthcare a person needs per year.  Market forces may be helpful on the macro level (like for a healthcare system) but there is no free market for healthcare on the micro level — imagine a person being asked  to choose between various methods of treating diabetes or the best way to remove an appendix (the decision is either random or biased by what the very person asking the question tells them).

The U.S. is experiencing something its citizens have not witnessed before:  the transition away from population healthcare decisions being made behind closed doors at insurance companies to those decisions being made in the political arena.  Other countries experience this all the time — just look at newspaper headlines in the UK or France over the past 20 years!

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