Generic Medications — where to get them

genericpillGeneric medications are supposed to be inexpensive!  But, not if you are facing price gouging.  Your favorite chain pharmacy may rip your wallet out and empty it.

The PBS NewsHour reported on 12/23/13 an astounding survey   — they found a generic medication for breast cancer (letrozole) ranged in price from $9 to $400 dollars for a 30 day supply.  Even more surprising the company that charged $400 dollars agreed to match the $9 price at a competitor.

Not only do pharmacies price gouge so do insurance companies.  Almost uniformly insurance drug plans add $20 to every generic prescription.  So a typical $10 generic prescription without insurance involvement will cost you a copay of $30 with insurance.  And, do you think the pharmacist will suggest you avoid using insurance — not usually, since the $20 copay is for them!

What should you do?

  • Shop around — check prices at several pharmacies
  • ASK if there is any program the pharmacy has to lower that price (sometimes if you get a shoppers card you get better prices)
  • You don’t need a membership to get prescriptions from Costco.  Consumer Reports rated them as having the best generic prices.
  • Here is a great place to check prices:  goodrx.com  (and they will print coupons for free!)
  • You can get mail order generics here with free shipping.  Usually their prices are good:  healthwarehouse.com
  • Don’t involve your insurance plan if it costs you more out of pocket than just outright paying for the prescription.
  • Insurance plans often limit the prescription to 30 days (with a copay every time).  Getting your prescription in 90 day amounts saves trips to the pharmacy and often improves the discount.
  • Pharmaceutical companies often make a long-acting medication just before the patent runs out on the short-acting form.  Ask your doctor if the long-acting medication is absolutely needed.  Sometimes taking a medication twice a day at a generic price is much less expensive than once a day at a brand name price.

The price gouging is astounding.  Patients often think a pharmacy just adds a small amount to the wholesale price.  Not so.  They often set the price at some percentage less that the brand name — hugely more profitable for them and devastating for consumers.

The price gouging makes you understand better why the UK and other countries have legislated a solution — they negotiate a country-wide price for each generic medication and allow only a few dollars to be charged as a dispensing fee.  The US has a long way to go to protect consumers and reduce health care costs.

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  1. #1 by Myra on December 28, 2013 - 12:17 PM

    How awful! If I found out I was paying almost 400 dollars more than I needed to, I would be so upset. I know that there’s theoretically supposed to be no morality in business, but how can you take advantage of someone who’s fighting cancer?

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