DIY Digital Diagnosis — better with some human input

man and algorithm

On 7/23/13 Laura Landro of the Wall Street Journal published an article about “A Better Digital Diagnosis”.  The essence of the story is on-line symptom checkers are available and may be useful to patients.   Just input your symptoms, get your diagnosis, call for an appointment, and get your treatment.  Sounds good; possibly too good.

Below are listed some good sources for information, some symptom checkers and some software to download to a smart phone.  The software is actually intended for health care providers and may have too much jargon for the average person.

However, before you jump in to get a diagnosis for what ails you try a test run.  OK, this is not a double blind experiment but worth your time.  The idea is to look up the details of a known disease then enter the published symptoms in the symptom checker and see what comes out.  You will find a huge variation, often the expected diagnosis does not even show up at all!

For example:  plantar faciitis.  This is a common disease of the foot caused by inflammation of the connective tissue in the sole of the foot especially causing pain just in front of the heel bone.  The striking and often diagnostic symptom is heel pain on first getting out of bed and walking.  The pain gets better after a few minutes of walking.  It is common in runners and people who spend lots of time standing.  Being overweight or wearing hard-sole shoes contributes.  As people get older the natural padding of the sole thins which is probably why the problem is common after age 50.

footpain

The symptoms were entered into several of the symptom checkers.  Esagil seemed to give every diagnosis know to medical science and nothing would narrow down the possibilities — every symptom could be due to syphilis.  The Mayo Clinic site required some human thinking.  Foot pain showed several areas to read about: after reading the material the diagnosis of plantar faciitis seems to fit.

The diagnosis of plantar faciitis can usually be made by a primary care provider in a flash — it is a common problem.  Worrying about whether you have syphilis is a waste of time and a real source of anxiety — if you ask the primary care provider whether you could have syphilis, you can almost count on some testing.

Once you have tested any symptom-checker and understand the limitations they can be helpful.  It’s almost like a second opinion about a problem.  Discuss the findings with the health care provider early in an office visitdon’t spring the information after the provider makes a plan.  Be a team player to prevent being at odds with the provider.


Good sources for medical information:

Evaluate symptoms / differential diagnosis

Smart Phone Apps

  • Android
    • Differential Daignosis by mHealth Labs, LLC
    • Differential Diagmosis by  Borm Bruckmeier Publishing LLC
    • Your Rapid Diagnosis for Android by  WWW Machealth
  • iPhone
    • Differential Diagnosis from the BMJ Group
    • Your Rapid Diagnosis by  WWW Machealth
    • VisualDx by Logical Images
    • Common Symptom Guide by Mobile Systems:

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  1. #1 by Yuz Asaf on August 21, 2013 - 12:35 PM

    it is a very nice writing. However, I consider that symptom checkers just can be reminders by matching symptom with diseases. For instance ESAGIL or Isabel, are automated tools that do that pretty well and are the best available online for free.

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